Shamrock

Shamrocks are the young sprigs of clover or trefoil. The shamrock is a symbol of Ireland. According to a legend, Saint Patrick used it to illustrate the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. The name shamrock is derived from Irish Lua error in package.lua at line 80: module 'Module:Language/data/iana scripts' not found.. This is the diminutive version of the Irish word for clover (Lua error in package.lua at line 80: module 'Module:Language/data/iana scripts' not found.) meaning simply "little clover" or "young clover".[1] Sometimes other three-leafed plants are called shamrocks. The shamrock can be used for its medicinal properties. It was used as a motif in Victorian days. Around March 17 (Saint Patrick's Day) small pots of shamrocks are sold. Some people wear sprigs of shamrock in a buttonhole on the holiday.

References

  1. Nelson, E. Charles, Shamrock: Botany and History of an Irish Myth, Boethius Press, 1991, isbn 0-86314-199-4, p. 14